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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea


Published November 14, 2013


LibriVox recording of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne. (Translated by F. P. Walter.)
Read in English by Michele Fry
Originally published 1870, this recording is from the English translation by Frederick P. Walter, published 1991, containing the unabridged text from the original French and offered up into the public domain. It is considered to be the very first science fiction novel ever written, the first novel about the undersea world, and is a classic science fiction novel by French writer Jules Verne published in 1870. It tells the story of Captain Nemo and his submarine Nautilus, as seen from the perspective of Professor Pierre Aronnax - Summary by Michele Fry

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Reviews

Reviewer: iamellade - - April 25, 2014
Subject: Wow!
Wow! Jules Verne is an amazing storyteller. I learned so much about the Earth's geography, the oceans, and secrets of the underwater world. It would have been a difficult read with all those scientific Latin names, but the reader, Michele Fry, enabled me to sail through it effortlessly and kept me spellbound. I really prefer audio books where there is just one reader, and Fry captured each character so well. Her reading brought me to the brink of tears a time or two. This has become one of my favorite audio books - it deserves 5 stars for sure.
Reviewer: Devours pages - - November 22, 2013
Subject: Fantastic!
What a shame picfixer's first review of this book was so negative. To the contrary, Jules Verne is brilliant. His imagination is spectacular. The depth of his study in preparation for writing the book, on a totally foreign subject matter (the ocean and it's life) is astonishing. The book was written on the 1860's and published in 1870!! One must recall that the internet, GPS mapping, etc. we're not available at the time - for that matter the first automobile hadn't yet been patented (Karl Benz, 1886), and Thomas Edison was just out of his teens. The book is written as a first-person narrative. It's narrator and central character, Pierre Aronnax, is a scientist and professor of marine biology. The book is his personal journal of a fantastic adventure aboard the Nautilus. As one would expect of the character, Aronnax enthusiastically describes and catalogues the marine life he encounters along the way. It creates a totally unique experience for the fiction enthusiast. Verne's personal transmogrification into this marine biologist is amazing. As a diver I can tell you that his underwater descriptions, such as how light appears under the ocean, are spot-on! I must believe Verne went diving to achieve this. Apart from my comments above, the story of the submarine, it's creator and captain, it's crew and it's captives is powerful, compelling and in the end, heart-wrenching.

Great credit is to be given to the reader. This is a complex work with a great deal of "professorial" language. Her cadence is perfect, her voice is pleasant and clear, her emotion believable. She does a great job of defining characters with different voices and accents (one character's voice, Conseil, I had difficulty getting used to, but his voice grew on me throughout the book and was very unique). She keeps the listener engaged. I heard no breathing, no unnatural pauses or breaks, no background noise...all-in-all, outstanding! I very much look forward to seeing more work from her in the future.
Reviewer: picfixer - - November 18, 2013
Subject: Not Verne's best
I was surprised to discover this famous work of early science fiction is in fact deadly dull, and replete with scientific errors Archimedes would have been happy to point out, as would any school boy who has dived into a pond in pursuit of frogs. Verne even gets some of the geography wrong, but what really draggs this novel down are the interminable and often geographically misplaced descriptions of fish, invertebrate and plant species. These rambling catalogues of fauna and flora take up large parts of many chapters.

No fault can be found with the reader who is clear and precise at all times. I hope she will return with a better choice of material
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